Journal of the Waterloo Campaign

B1729

This is one of the most outstanding eyewitness accounts of the Waterloo Campaign and provides an excellent balance against the French perspective. It is not too much to say that this is one of the most outstanding journals from any period of military history. At the time of the battle, the author was a relatively junior officer in acting command of a Royal Horse Artillery Troop.

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NAME: Journal of the Waterloo Campaign
CLASSIFICATION: Book Reviews
FILE: R1729
DATE: 230512
AUTHOR: General Mercer, edited and introduced by Andrew Uffindell
PUBLISHER: Pen & Sword
BINDING: hard back
PAGES: 395
PRICE: £25.00
GENRE: Non fiction
SUBJECT: French Revolutionary and Napoleonic Wars, Napoleon, Blucher, Wellington. Horse artillery, 1815 Campaign, Waterloo, occupation of Paris
ISBN: 1-78159-043-5
IMAGE: B1729.jpg
BUYNOW: http://tinyurl.com/cghj8th
LINKS: http://tinyurl.com/
DESCRIPTION: This is one of the most outstanding eyewitness accounts of the Waterloo Campaign and provides an excellent balance against the French perspective. It is not too much to say that this is one of the most outstanding journals from any period of military history. At the time of the battle, the author was a relatively junior officer in acting command of a Royal Horse Artillery Troop. His journal is an engrossing and complete journal that describes the campaign from his landing in Ostend, through the Battle of Waterloo to the occupation of Paris and the conclusion of the war. His account is as fresh today as when he wrote it, in part a testimony to his journalistic style and in part on the introduction and editing of Andrew Uffindell. The text is very ably supported by numerous maps and sketches setting the positions and movements of the armies and showing the dress of the various military units. Modern photographs slot seamlessly into the text and engravings of building and scenery add to the depth of the story. Of those eyewitness accounts of battles, campaigns and wars, most concentrate on the mechanics of warfare and discuss terrain only in the part it plays in the conduct of warfare. Mercer has provided insights into social attitudes and to the full life of the soldier including leave and periods of waiting. The pictures he paints with his words are active and in colour. This book is informative but it is also engaging and opens a window into the times as well as the events. Some of his descriptions almost have the flavour of a tourist passing through a new landscape and observing carefully with delight and wonder. The introduction and the description of Mercer’s Troop, together with a Preface by Mercer’s son, place the journal in perspective adding to the picture of the author. This is a book not to be missed.

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