German Army In Normandy, 1st Leibstandarte, Adolf Hitler SS Panzer Division

KB0158

This DVD should be watched alongside the DVD from BHTV covering the Medieval Crecy campaign where there are important similarities between the battles of 1944 and 1346, as there are also between the latter stages of the Crecy campaign with the campaigns of Marlborough and Wellington and the actions in the Low Countries during WWI and WWII. The BHTV approach to military history highlights the similarities down the ages, introduced by terrain. The importance of logisitics is also remarkably similar. From Crecy to Waterloo, it was shipping and landing, fodder for the horses, food, ammunition and equipment. In 1944, main change was that petrol and diesel replaced hay in feeding the mechanised motive forces.

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NAME: German Army In Normandy, 1st Leibstandarte, Adolf Hitler SS Panzer Division
CLASSIFICATION: Video, DVD, reviews
FILE: K0158
DATE: 180613
PRESENTER(S): Tim Saunders, Richard Hone, Andrew Duff
PUBLISHER: Pen & Sword Digital
MEDIA: DVD
FORMAT: Dual layer
RUNTIME: 110 minutes
PLAYERS: Linux Workstation, Personal Computer, Mac Computer, DVD Player
INTERNET:
PRICE: £12.99
GENRE: Non-Fiction
SUBJECT: World War Two, Second World War, WWII, 1944, D-Day, break-out, Allied army, German army, western France, Normandy, invasion, SS Panzers, tank warfare, Churchill tank, US forces
ISBN: 0-24762-017-3
IMAGE: KB0158
VIDEO:
BUYNOW: http://tinyurl.com/ohr536e
LINKS:
DESCRIPTION: For those who have already viewed a BHTV DVD published by Pen & Sword, this is another well-researched, scripted, presented and filmed work. The photography and lighting is first class with a good sound track. For those who have not viewed a BHTV DVD before and have only experience of broadcast tv programmes, this is a significantly better product than their previous experiences. Even the best tv historical documentaries tend to feature breathless professional presenters who may have little knowledge of their subject and attempt to dramatize the presentation and/or patronize their audience. This can take the shine off even the best-researched and scripted tv productions.

The BHTV approach is very different. The presenters are former soldiers, historians and authors, many also acting as battlefield tour guides. Their starting point is the assumption that the audience already has some interest in the subject and may already have studied it with some enthusiasm. As former soldiers, they have a feel for the terrain and this is important to the understanding of battlefields. Commanders seek to fight on terrain that favours them, making use of natural features to increase their potency in battle Every commander has some choice, but is also channelled by natural features, making the choice of beaches for landings, and routes of advance, significant factors in the eventual choice of battlefield and the outcome of a campaign.

The BHTV team producing this DVD has followed the BHTV established approach, combining location filming with the use of maps drawings, paintings and artefacts to bring the battle to life. There is not need for artificial dramatics because the events the presenters recount are already dramatic. To add to the depth of information and colour, the presenters are working with members of the Second Battle Group Living History Society who re-enact WWII battles. These enthusiasts build up considerable knowledge of their chosen period and take great trouble to ensure that they equipment themselves with accurate reproductions of clothing, arms and armour. Within their group, they faithfully reproduce the complete range of personnel making up a field army of the period. This provides an opportunity to see how the technology and practices of the past impact on the conduct of military campaigns.

In this DVD, the presenters examine the series of battles that took place between the Allied Forces Canadian and British troops with the German 21st Panzer Division under Baron von Luck and the 1st Leibstandarte Waffen SS force. The British objective was to prevent the Germans advancing West to cut the US forces breaking out of their beachhead. This was to result in considerable British, Canadian and German casualties in a hard fought campaign where Baron von Luck encouraged a Luftwaffe 88mm flak company to serve as an anti-tank force that caused considerable casualties amongst the British armour. Overall, the campaign was a victory for the British and Canadians because they met their primary objective of protecting the US breakout. When remnants of the Leibstandarte eventually made contact with US forces they were a shadow of their former strength and unable to make an impact on the US breakout.

There are many conflicting views of the Waffen SS, but this DVD demonstrates how this force had evolved into a warrior formation from its roots in the Nazi Party and its service as a Pretorian Guard for Hitler and concentration and death camp guards. The British, Canadian and German troops engaged in the fighting developed great mutual respect, although it is interesting that Baron von Luck displayed a higher regard for the British than for his SS comrades in Normandy. This demonstrates that the old professional officer corps never completely accepted the Waffen SS, although when the assassination attempt on Hitler was reported, the first reaction of SS and Wehrmacht officers was to wonder whether the attack was by the SS or the German Army.

This DVD should be watched alongside the DVD from BHTV covering the Medieval Crecy campaign where there are important similarities between the battles of 1944 and 1346, as there are also between the latter stages of the Crecy campaign with the campaigns of Marlborough and Wellington and the actions in the Low Countries during WWI and WWII. The BHTV approach to military history highlights the similarities down the ages, introduced by terrain. The importance of logisitics is also remarkably similar. From Crecy to Waterloo, it was shipping and landing, fodder for the horses, food, ammunition and equipment. In 1944, main change was that petrol and diesel replaced hay in feeding the mechanised motive forces.

The resulting DVD is very watchable, the re-enactment and specially commissioned maps providing a vivid picture of life in the Second World War. The presenters add the authenticity of people with military experience who are also closely engaged in the research and scripting that make this a memorable historical military documentary

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