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Brand new and back in stock
T-54/55 The Handley Page Victor Flight Craft 16: The Hawker Hunter in British Service

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£11.99
RRP: £14.99

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£13.50
RRP: £16.99
Rome: Republic into Empire Tiger I and Tiger II Tanks, German Army and Waffen-SS, The Last Battles in the West, 1945 Struggle and Suffrage in Nottingham

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The Food Bible The Wildlife Gardener British Battleships of World War One

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£13.59
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£36.00
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Author honoured with Spirit of Anne Frank Human Writes Award

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£25.00
The Anne Frank Center for Mutual Respect is honouring Jack J. Hersch with the 2019 Spirit of Anne Frank Human Writes Award for his breathtaking book, Death March Escape, chronicling his father’s escapes from two Nazi death marches. Past recipients include Arthur Miller, Nicholas Kristof and Steve Berry. Jack says, “It is immensely meaningful to me to be honoured this way. My father would have been thrilled.”

About the book: In June 1944, the Nazis locked eighteen-year-old Dave Hersch into a railroad boxcar and shipped him from his hometown of Dej, Hungary, to Mauthausen Concentration Camp, the harshest, cruellest camp in the Reich. After ten months in the granite mines of Mauthausen’s nearby sub-camp, Gusen, he weighed less than 80lbs, nothing but skin and bones.

Somehow surviving the relentless horrors of these two brutal camps, as Allied forces drew near Dave was forced to join a death march to Gunskirchen Concentration Camp, over thirty miles away. Soon after the start of the march, and more dead than alive, Dave summoned a burst of energy he did not know he had and escaped. Quickly recaptured, he managed to avoid being killed by the guards. Put on another death march a few days later, he achieved the impossible: he escaped again.

Dave often told his story of survival and escape, and his son, Jack, thought he knew it well. But years after his father’s death, he came across a photograph of his father on, of all places, the Mauthausen Memorial’s website. It was an image he had never seen before – and it propelled him on an intensely personal journey of discovery.

Using only his father’s words for guidance, Jack takes us along as he flies to Europe to learn the secrets behind the photograph, secrets his father never told of his time in the camps. Beginning in the verdant hills of his father’s Hungarian hometown, we travel with Jack to the foreboding rock mines of Mauthausen and Gusen Concentration Camps, to the dust-choked roads and intersections of the death marches, and, finally, to the makeshift hiding places of his father’s rescuers. We accompany Jack’s every step as he describes the unimaginable: what his father must have seen and felt while struggling to survive in the most abominable places on earth.

In a warm and emotionally engaging story, Jack digs deeply into both his father’s life and his own, revisiting – and reflecting on – his father’s time at the hands of the Nazis during the last year of the Second World War, when more than mere survival was at stake – the fate of humanity itself hung in the balance.

Also available in Kindle and ePub formats

Coming soon – bestselling preorders, with 20% off RRPs
The True Story of the Great Escape The Southwold Railway 1879–1929 The Falklands War – There and Back Again The Royal Navy Wasp

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As seen in the press

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£19.99

A History of Cadbury by Diane Wordsworth.

As featured by the Mail Online: How Cadbury’s rose: Nostalgic photos reveal how Britain’s favourite chocolate manufacturer went from single shop to global empire over two centuries.

When John Cadbury came to Birmingham in 1824, he sold tea, coffee and drinking chocolate in a small shop on Bull Street. Drinking chocolate was considered a healthy alternative to alcohol, something Cadbury, a Quaker, was keen to encourage.

In 1879, the Cadburys moved to Bournville and created their ‘factory in a garden’ – an unprecedented move. It is now ironic that today’s Bournville is surrounded by that urban sprawl the Cadburys were so keen to get away from.

This book looks at some of the social impact this company has had since its inception, both on the chocolate and cocoa business in general and on the community at large, both within and without the firm of Cadbury.

In 2024, Cadbury’s will be celebrating 200 years of the first store opening. This is the story of how the company began, how it grew, and how they diversified in order to survive.

Brand new eBook releases
Major & Mrs Holt’s Concise Illustrated Battlefield Guide – The Western Front – North Southern Electrics Lake Ilmen, 1942 The Real Enid Blyton

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£10.19

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£15.00

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£4.99
Attila the Hun Arras Counter-Attack 1940 A Muddy Trench: A Sniper’s Bullet Belgium in the Great War

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£7.79

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Fallschirmjäger: German Paratroopers – 1937–1941 Walking Waterloo With The Royal Navy in War and Peace Deadlines on the Front Line

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eBook of the week: The Colditz Hostages – only £4.99

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£4.99

The Colditz Hostages – Hitler’s VIP Pawns by Giles Romily and Michael Alexander.

Giles Romilly and Michael Alexander were amongst a select group of prisoners of war who were segregated from the other prisoners and were labelled the Prominente. The authors recount their varied experiences in captivity. Romilly, a journalist covering the Norway Campaign, was captured at Narvik in April 1940. Alexander was taken in August 1942 when engaged in a raid behind the German lines in North Africa. In due course, because of their family connections to people of influence, both of them ended up in an isolation area of Colditz Castle, where they were joined by several more, including Earl Haig, the son of the C-in-C of the BEF, the commander of the Polish Army in the Warsaw Uprising and, the last to arrive, the son of the US Ambassador to London.

In April 1945, in the face of the advancing American armies and on Himmler’s instructions, the Prominente were removed from the Castle. In due course they became split up. Romilly managed to escape soon after the removal from Colditz with the assistance of a Dutch officer. The remainder survived to be liberated, despite Hitler’s order for them to be executed.

The book is beautifully written. Romilly, in particular, shows himself to be an excellent observer: of the character of his fellow prisoners both before and during his time as a Prominente; and of the last, chaotic days of the Third Reich. His description of the scenes he witnessed in the newly liberated Dachau Camp, soon after his arrival in the allied lines, remain extraordinarily powerful.

The book received a warm reception from the critics at the time of its first publication in 1954 and was singled out for high praise by, amongst others, Airey Neave MP, assassinated by the INLA in 1979, himself a prisoner and the first successful British escaper from Colditz.

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